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National Scout Jamboree

The national Scout jamboree is a gathering, or jamboree of thousands of members of the Boy Scouts of America, usually held every four years and organized by the National Council of the BSA. Referred to as "the Jamboree", "Jambo", or NSJ, Scouts from all over the nation and world have the opportunity to attend. They are considered to be one of several unique experiences that Scouting offers.

The first jamboree was scheduled to be held in 1935 in Washington, D.C. to celebrate the 25th anniversary of Scouting, but was delayed two years. The 1937 jamboree in the Nation's Capital attracted 25,000 Scouts, who camped around the Washington Monument and Tidal Basin. The event was covered extensively by national media and attended by President Franklin D. Roosevelt.

Following the disruption of World War II, the next jamboree was not held until 1950 in Valley Forge, Pennsylvania. Subsequent jamborees have been held around the country as a means to promoting Scouting nationally. From 1981 to 2010, the jamboree has been located Fort A.P. Hill, Virginia. Beginning in 2013, jamborees will be permanently held at The Summit: Bechtel Family National Scout Reserve in West Virginia. A jamboree is held for several consecutive days and offers many activities for youth participants and the 300,000 members of the general public who visit it.